KAPAMPANGAN

Kapampangan or Capampan͠gan refers to the language and people of Pampanga province. It is also known as Pampango or Pampangueño. A woman from Pampanga is called a Pampangueña.
 

Kapampangan ka ba?
Are you a native of Pampanga?

Marunong ka bang magsalita ng Kapampangan?
= Marunong ka bang mangapampangan?
Do you know how to speak Capampangan?


Note that Kapampangan is NOT a mere dialect. It is a language very distinct from Tagalog.


Click here for examples of Kapampangan words and phrases!

Ilocano or Ilokano

Ilocano is a language very distinct from Tagalog. Variously spelled as Ilocano, Ilokano, Ilukano, Ilucano, Iluko, Iloco or Iloko, it is the third most-spoken language in the Philippines. Continue reading “Ilocano or Ilokano”

Business Vocabulary List

buwis
tax

tubo
interest

tubo sa utang
interest on a loan

walang tubo
no interest

opisyal
official

kumpanya
company

suhol
bribe

dokumento
document

mga dokumento
documents

papeles
papers

negosyo
business

negosyante
businessman /
businesswoman

kontrata
contract

pera
money

 

bayad
payment

utang
debt

pautang
loan

bangko
bank

tseke
check

Strongly recommended: Doing Business in Tagalog

News on Business in the Philippines

The economy of the Philippines is expected to grow by 6.7% this year, making it the best-performing economy in Southeast Asia.

The truth about Ramar Foods’ Magnolia Ice Cream in the USA. Watch the video below from the real Magnolia Ice Cream of the Philippines.

Note that Ramar Foods is NOT the Magnolia ice cream you knew growing up in the Philippines. Always check the label.

Boycott Ramar’s Orientex Lumpia!! Boycott Ramar’s Magnolia Imitation!!

Continue reading “News on Business in the Philippines”

The Modern Filipino Alphabet

Before the Spanish arrived in the Philippines in the 16th century, the people of the islands used a writing script called baybayin. It was the Spaniards who introduced Latin or Western letters to the Philippines.

In the 1930s, the renowned scholar Lope K. Santos developed the abakada which is an alphabet representing the sounds in the Tagalog language. It consists of  twenty letters (five vowels and fifteen consonants).

a, b, k, d, e, g, h, i, l, m, n, ng, o, p, r, s, t, u, w, y

In 1976, the Department of Education, Culture and Sports (DECS) of the Philippines issued a revised alphabet which added the letters c, ch, f, j, ll, ñ, q, rr, v, x and z.

Filipino Alphabet Pronunciation

Continue reading “The Modern Filipino Alphabet”

Filipino? Tagalog? Pilipino?

The basis for the Philippine national language is Tagalog, which had primarily been spoken only in Manila and the surrounding provinces when the Commonwealth constitution was drawn up in the 1930s. That constitution provided for a national language, but did not specifically designate it as Tagalog because of objections raised by representatives from other parts of the country where Tagalog was not spoken. It merely stated that a national language acceptable to the entire populace (and ideally incorporating elements from the diverse languages spoken throughout the islands) would be a future goal. Tagalog, of course, by virtue of being the lingua franca of those who lived in or near the government capital, was the predominant candidate.

Continue reading “Filipino? Tagalog? Pilipino?”

Basic Cebuano Phrases

Sebuwano is a language very distinct from Tagalog, but we get enough inquiries about Cebuano that we decided to list a few basic phrases.

Continue reading “Basic Cebuano Phrases”

FILIPINO

In the English language, the word Filipino often refers to something from or related to the Philippines.

For examples:

  • Filipino cuisine – food associated with the Philippines
  • Filipino people – ethnic group that identifies with the Philippines
  • Filipino language – national language of the Philippines
  • Continue reading “FILIPINO”