BOLERO

Also see bola

bolero
flatterer
(male)

bolera
flatterer
(female)

bolero
a man who flatters a woman

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Tinikling Dance

Tinikling involves two people hitting bamboo poles on the ground and against each other in coordination with one or more dancers who step over and in between the poles in a dance. It originated in Leyte among the Visayan islands in central Philippines as an imitation of the tikling bird.

Once taught simply as a folk dance from the Philippines, it has recently become popular in the sports curricula of elementary schools as it involves skills similar to jumping rope. It’s now a new, fun form of aerobic exercise that also improves spatial awareness, rhythm, foot and leg speed, agility, and coordination.

Tinikling: Philippine Dance

There are now so many tinikling products available in the United States. Not just tinikling music CDs and dance-steps instruction DVDs, but also tinikling sticks and cords! For the authentic experience, you must find thick bamboo poles!

Listen to this introduction.

Click here to read the transcripts of what she’s saying.

Dating & Courtship in the Philippines

The Tagalog word for ‘courtship’ is panliligaw.

A common statement by Filipino men said to Filipinas:

Gusto kitang ligawan.
I’d like to court you.

This is to ask for permission to woo the woman. If she says no, then she is definitely not interested. If she says anything that is not a no, you have the go-ahead to try your hand at winning her affection. Continue reading “Dating & Courtship in the Philippines”

Filipino Brooms

There are two words in the dictionary that can serve as translations for the English “broom.”

The simple noun that is widely used is walis.

Up until a few decades ago, the word pamalis (pangwalis) was also common, and if you use it today, it can still be understood, because it is a conjugation of the verb walis and it literally means “something used for sweeping.”

Brooms of the Philippines

There are two types of native brooms used in the Philippines — the walis tingting for outdoors and the walis tambo for smooth floors indoors and perhaps on the patio.

Walis-tingting is a broom made from the thin midribs of palm leaves. The stiff ribs are tied up on one end. It is usually paired with a simply constructed dustpan, as you can see in the picture. The can used for the dustpan is usually a cutout of an aluminum can of cooking oil.

Walis Tingting at Daspan

walis tingting at daspan
broom and “dustpan”

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Noche Buena: Filipino Christmas Eve

Noche Buena derives from the Spanish for “A Good Night.” It is the traditional feast Filipinos partake in after the midnight mass.

Noche Buena: Philippines

Simbang Gabi is Tagalog for “Night Worship” or “Night Mass.” Filipinos attend pre-dawn masses in the nine days before Christmas Eve. It is known as Misa de Gallo (Mass of the Cock / Rooster) in Spanish. Roosters crow very early in the morning, and this season’s masses take place at 4:00 am. Continue reading “Noche Buena: Filipino Christmas Eve”

Filipino Superstitions

Ilang mga pamahiin ng mga Pilipino…

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PABALAT-BUNGA

This is a Filipino cultural norm of extending invitations and offering help or praise, even without really meaning it. It’s usually a matter of etiquette or saving face.

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BILAO

Now a multi-purpose flat round basket tray…

A bilao is a flat round-shaped rice winnower, a traditional implement in the Philippines. It is usually made from woven wood.

To winnow is to free grain from the lighter particles of chaff, dirt, small stones, etc., especially by throwing it into the air and perhaps allowing the wind to blow away impurities.

Up until a few decades ago, you would see a bilao hanging in the back of the house by the kitchen. And you’d see women using a bilao to adroitly “turn” (toss) white rice grains on it for the purpose of removing unwanted particles, like small stones.

Suman on Bilao
Suman on Bilao

These days, you’re more likely to see the bilao used as a food container. So now, you’re most likely to see it lined with banana leaves on top of which a lot of food is arranged.

Click here to learn a few related Tagalog words.