ABANIKO

from the Spanish abanico

abaniko
a traditional fan of the Philippines

Pamaypay Online

The Filipino abaniko as shown above is made from the stems and leaves of the plant having the scientific name Belamcanda chinensis.

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Filipino Brooms

There are two words in the dictionary that can serve as translations for the English “broom.”

The simple noun that is widely used is walis.

Up until a few decades ago, the word pamalis (pangwalis) was also common, and if you use it today, it can still be understood, because it is a conjugation of the verb walis and it literally means “something used for sweeping.”

Brooms of the Philippines

There are two types of native brooms used in the Philippines — the walis tingting for outdoors and the walis tambo for smooth floors indoors and perhaps on the patio.

Walis-tingting is a broom made from the thin midribs of palm leaves. The stiff ribs are tied up on one end. It is usually paired with a simply constructed dustpan, as you can see in the picture. The can used for the dustpan is usually a cutout of an aluminum can of cooking oil.

Walis Tingting at Daspan

walis tingting at daspan
broom and “dustpan”

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SUYOD

Fine Hair Comb Used by Filipinos To Get Rid of Lice

The word suyod is likely Chinese in origin.

suyod
fine-toothed comb used to remove lice

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BILAO

A bilao is a flat round-shaped rice winnower, a traditional implement in the Philippines. It is usually made from woven wood.

To winnow is to free grain from the lighter particles of chaff, dirt, small stones, etc., especially by throwing it into the air and perhaps allowing the wind to blow away impurities.

Up until a few decades ago, you would see a bilao hanging in the back of the house by the kitchen. And you’d see women using a bilao to adroitly “turn” (toss) white rice grains on it for the purpose of removing unwanted particles, like small stones.

Suman on Bilao
Suman on Bilao

These days, you’re more likely to see the bilao used as a food container. So now, you’re most likely to see it lined with banana leaves on top of which a lot of food is arranged.

Click here to learn a few related Tagalog words.

KUDYAPI

Kudyapi is a two-stringed long-necked lute common in Mindanao and Palawan.

kudyapi
KUDYAPI, musical instruments of the Philippines

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SUNGKIT

pagkuha ng anumang bagay na nasa itaas sa paggamit ng panungkit o kawit

A sungkit is a pole with a hook attached on one end, used to pick fruits.

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PANDAKOT

root word: dakot

This is the native Tagalog word for a dustpan, the implement you use together with a broom for cleaning.

Walis Tingting at Daspan

Showing off native resourcefulness, many Filipinos often use the cutout of a large aluminum can of cooking oil for creating a dustpan. Take a close look at the photo. 🙂

walis tingting at pandakot
broom and dustpan

Ang pandakot ay isang kasangkapang panlinis na karaniwang katambal ng walis. A dustpan is a cleaning tool that is commonly paired with a broom.

In many cases, Filipinos simply use the non-standard English-derived word daspan.

TABO

The ubiquitous Philippine cultural artifact found in almost every Filipino household’s bathroom.

tabò
water dipper

tabo
dipper used for scooping up water

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