NG (“of” )

ng

By itself, ng serves as a possessive or genitive marker in Tagalog sentences. An easy way to look at one of its uses is to see it as meaning ‘of’ in English.

balat ng hayop
skin of an animal
(animal’s skin)

 

anak ng babae
child of a woman
(a woman’s child)

 

ulo ng tao
head of a person
(a person’s head)

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Clothing & Accessories

The general Tagalog word for “clothes” is damit. It is also the specific word used to refer to a female’s dress.

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Months of the Year

The Tagalog word buwan means both ‘month’ and ‘moon.’

 

Enero
January

 

Hulyo
July
 

Pebrero
February

 

Agosto
August
 

Marso
March

 

Setyembre
September
 

Abril
April

 

Oktubre
October
 

Mayo
May

 

Nobyembre
November
 

Hunyo
June

 

 

Disyembre
December

 

KAMUSTA o KUMUSTA

The word comes from the Spanish phrase ¿Cómo está?

The standard Tagalog spelling is Kumusta, but most Filipinos now use Kamusta.

Kamusta?
What’s up?

Kamusta ka?
How are you?
(don’t use with old people)

Kamusta ka na?
How have you been?
= “What’s up?”

Kamusta na po kayo?
How are you?
(polite version for older people)

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‘Where’ in Tagalog

The Tagalog word for ‘where’ is
saan.

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Ask ‘Who’ in Tagalog

Sino?
Who?

Sino ka?
Who are you?

Sino siya?
Who is she?
=Who is he?

Sino ang kasama mo?
Who’s with you?

Sino ang kausap mo?
Who are you talking to?

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Bad Words in Tagalog

The Tagalog word puta literally means ‘whore’ but is used as an expletive to express anger or frustration like ‘fuck’ in English.

Anak ng puta!
Son of a bitch!
– sounds more extreme in Tagalog than in English

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10 Survival Travel Words

Try your best with 10 basic Tagalog words!

Saan? = Where?

Pakituro. = Please point.

Magkano? = How much?

Pakisulat. = Please write.
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