NINYO

The word ninyo is what grammarians call a “genitive pronoun.”

It works like a plural version of mo (‘you’).

Talking to one person:

Anong ginagawa mo?
What are you doing?

Talking to two or more persons:

Anong ginagawa ninyo?
What are you doing?

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“That’s Life” in Tagalog

buhay
life

buhay sa Pilipinas
life in the Philippines

buhay sa Amerika
life in America

Ganyan talaga ang buhay.
That’s the way life is.

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NG (“of” )

ng

By itself, ng serves as a possessive or genitive marker in Tagalog sentences. An easy way to look at one of its uses is to see it as meaning ‘of’ in English.

balat ng hayop
skin of an animal
(animal’s skin)

 

anak ng babae
child of a woman
(a woman’s child)

 

ulo ng tao
head of a person
(a person’s head)

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Talking about Names

The Tagalog word for ‘name’ is pangalan.

Ano ang pangalan mo?
What’s your name?

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I Don’t Want in Tagalog

The Tagalog word for “do not want” is ayaw.

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Kissing in Tagalog

Halikan mo ako.
Kiss me.

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Months of the Year

The Tagalog word buwan means both ‘month’ and ‘moon.’

 

Enero
January

 

Hulyo
July
 

Pebrero
February

 

Agosto
August
 

Marso
March

 

Setyembre
September
 

Abril
April

 

Oktubre
October
 

Mayo
May

 

Nobyembre
November
 

Hunyo
June

 

 

Disyembre
December

 

‘Happy Birthday’

The Tagalog word for ‘birthday’ is kaarawan.

The traditional way of greeting a Filipino a happy birthday is to say:

Maligayang Bati

Maligayang Bati
Maligayang Bati

This means “Happy Wishes” or “Joyful Greetings” but it’s understood to be referring to one’s birthday.

With the influence of English, most Filipinos translate the phrase “Happy Birthday” literally and these days say…

Maligayang Kaarawan!
Happy Birthday!

Maligayang Bati sa Iyong Kaarawan!
Happy Wishes on Your Birthday!

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